Madam Kwa and her glasses

Images of Mr Lee Kuan Yew‘s beloved wife, Madam Kwa Geok Choo, have shown up very frequently in articles, videos, reports after the passing away of the great man.

Apparently Madam Kwa had been a great partner, adviser and assistant to Mr Lee. As a highly-educated woman, she also led a successful career as a lawyer and made great contributions to Singapore.

In most of the photos of Kwa across all her life span, she wore glasses and smiled elegantly. The black and white photos that were taken while she was at her 20s and 30s are especially impressive. The glasses nicely brought out this woman’s inner sense of intelligence, independence and a little bit of determination, which is a great definition of feminism for smart young woman like her during that era. At a time when educated Asian women like Kwa were still not very common, these glasses are no doubt a symbol of modernity and surpass their actual practical purposes.

Kwa’s glasses reminded me of Coco Chanel‘s little black jacket — probably invented around the same time when these black and white photos of young Kwa were taken. While just like how the little black jacket has been consistently reinvented in the new world of post/neo/hyper modernity, the feminism that was defined by Kwa’s glasses has also rapidly moved to a new and exciting stage.

Here is a fresh example of that:

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However I probably wouldn’t remember as clearly about Hillary’s glasses after flicking through any article full of her with glasses.

Back to the topic, this is my favorite photo of Madam Kwa:

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— To memorise this amazing woman who had set up a great precedent of woman behind a great man, also to celebrate many other women who are standing or about to stand right in front of every other man.

Singapore: Tweet for Treasure

One friend invited me to this very interesting Twitter activity started by StarHub, the second largest broadband company in Singapore. The activity is called ‘Great Singapore treasure hunt’. Although the participation of this activity involves both getting clues online and “hunting for treasure” offline in the city of Singapore, I found this activity a very successful case for the broadband company to engage its current and potential customers via social media.

 

Basically the website releases a new round of task every one or two days via Twitter, the task includes the hunting for “treasure” within CBD of Singapore, and  the details of the instructions and clues will be only tweeted to people who joined the twitter group. It usually requires the participants to solve the riddles online with the help of tools such as Google, Flickr, YouTube and Windows Live Messenger. The first person who solve the riddles (by tweeting the answer back) and get to the location where treasure is placed can win a cheque for S$10,000. The “treasure hunt” actually emphasizes the importance of the speed, which is an important part of the brand image of StarHub broadband.

 

The fans of the activity also have a Facebook group, which is said to have amassing over 25,000 fans in a three-week period and became Singapore’s largest Facebook fan group.

(Pic Source:tweet a treasure in Twitter)